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My journey with back pain started many years ago. I have terrible posture, I clench my jaw, and I carry all my stress in my back and shoulders. But after having kids, oh man, did it get worse. Nine years of pregnancies, nursing, holding babies, wrangling toddlers, bending over car seats, and endlessly picking items off the floor have taken their toll.
I can say unequivocally that this is one of the more challenging times for families. With homeschooling, social distancing, and the uncertainty of when this new normal will abate and we can reconnect, travel, or even go to the...
Our daily routine has helped us maintain a sense of structure. I’m teaching my kiddos about responsibility and the importance of a daily routine, but also about flexibility and the element of surprise. As long as we’re getting our daily chores done (make the beds, clean up, brush our teeth), there’s always room for spontaneity and fun!
I have been Zooming all week. Staff meetings, department meetings, morning meetings, read alouds for my kids, a special 'happy birthday' for my son, and my favorite — happy hour. Zoom happy hour has become a regular part of my day, when I carve out time to enjoy a drink (or more) and chat with friends. These calls have been vital to my week and help keep me sane and grounded each night.
In the midst of everything, I'm secretly a little happy about having a few weeks with my kiddo unexpectedly. I'm excited for board games, movie nights, endless games of hopscotch, and bubbles in the backyard. However, I'm also going to need to keep my kiddo's mind occupied at least long enough for me to shower and maintain some of my sanity. The reality is that I'm an introvert and she's an extrovert, and when she's uttered 300,000 words before lunch my brain feels a little fried.
A full night's sleep offered some needed perspective the next day: My family was safely home together. We had plenty of food. We were all healthy. As the media highlighted those who were not as fortunate, I knew I did not want to take our situation for granted. 
Things are uncertain and scary right now. There's no way to know when life will return to normal — when we'll all look back on this time and say "remember when." But there are certainly some silver linings to it all. We're slowing down and really focusing on family time. We're doing everything we can to make sure things are relatively calm as we set new routines for our kids. If you're anything like me, you're also using this time for yourself as best as you can. It's easy to get wrapped up in what our kids need most, but we can't forget to take care of ourselves right now. Because, as we all know, you can't pour from an empty cup. So here are a few suggestions for how to take care of yourself amidst the craziness.
The beautiful truth is, the day I first told her about her CP probably won’t be a defining moment in her life, because she was really too young to remember it. It was, though, a defining moment in mine. It was a shift in the way we related to each other, and for the first time since her diagnosis I felt like I wasn’t lying to her anymore. It was in that moment I found the power of being honest, open, and matter of fact.
When I found out I was pregnant, my biggest fear and most Googled subject was about food. I prayed and pep talked my son in utero about not being a picky eater. I kept a pretty balanced diet while pregnant, too, with my most specific cravings being apples, broccoli, and Honey Nut Cheerios (shout out to my husband for always coming home with what I wanted). 
"But what if you die and I remarry and she wants to have kids?" "What if (heaven forbid) something happens to one of our kids and we want to try to have another?" Lately, we've been having a lot of conversations...
These morning walks have changed my life. I promise I am not dramatizing it. Getting to see the beginning of a new day full of possibilities is nothing short of a blessing. And with the days getting longer comes earlier sunrises, which is my favorite part of my walks.
Mom life is a marathon, not a sprint. You see, every mom I’ve ever known, near and far, experiences mom guilt to some degree, at some point in their journey of motherhood. And typically, it doesn’t serve us, especially when it leads us to say no to the things that fill us up. So here are a few ways I’ve found to kick mom guilt to the curb and live my #momlife marathon to the fullest.
If what you’re doing feels overwhelming, pick one part of it that you CAN do. Prioritize and decide what the most important, necessary pieces are — instead of what would be the ideal. (Cue the song from Daniel Tiger: “When something is hard to do, try it a little bit at a time.”)
It is well known that New Year's resolutions seldom work out (80% of people do not keep them). So how about we consider something different for this year's transition from 2019 into 2020?
My daughter learned how to stretch her body and wait patiently for her turn. Her teachers encouraged her to look in the mirror and be proud of who she saw looking back at her. She sang songs while she danced, practiced walking on her tiptoes like a princess, was encouraged to use good manners, and, above all, learned to be kind to her classmates.
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Guide To Boston

Boston Moms Guide to School at Home

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Whether your children are attending school in person, online, at home, or a combination of all three, Boston Moms has got you covered! This resource...
classic pasta salad recipe - Boston Moms

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